Recipe Website Roundup: Elena’s Pantry and Simply Recipes

I am in a bit of a food rut. I've made chili and wild rice meatballs as my main stays for the past two weeks. Don't get me wrong–these are great, balanced meal and snack options. Two of my favorites as a matter of fact. But I am in desperate need of some fresh food ideas, particularly for dinners.

2 Great Low-Carb Recipe Sites

I haven't tried any of the recipes on these sites, but I am looking forward to it. And a bonus: both of these sites work with my recipe manager app for iPad and iPhone, Paprika.

  • Elena's Pantry: My sister turned me on to this site, and it looks fabulous. Elena does a lot with almond flour to make paleo baked goods (careful here: still consider things like the Paleo Tag-Alongs as a treat, even though they are a better option than the real thing!). Her roast chicken recipes look simple, easy, and delicious, especially the Rosemary Apple Chicken. She has many gluten and dairy-free options. I am going to try one of her breads and serve it with my corned beef and cabbage this year!
  • Simply Recipes: Elena is often inspired by this website written by Elise Bauer. I really liked her take on vegetables (I need to eat more of these!), like the Hoison Glazed Brussel Sprouts. She also has many gluten free options. She does use flour in many of her recipes. Simply adapt the recipes with coconut or almond flour for gluten-free, low-carb eating.

Share your favorite recipe site with me in the comments.

Rosemary Apple Chicken

 

 

 

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Thoughts on how to navigate Turkey Day (or Carb Fest 2012)

As we head into the Thanksgiving Holiday weekend, I am thinking about and planning for how I am going to enjoy the holiday without gorging on carbs. I just don't want to lose any more ground, as I try to maintain my weight loss (it has been a struggle the last few months). I have done well the last few major holidays, but Thanksgiving has always been a challenge for me. I just love the food combinations present: sweet jellied cranberries with savory turkey; stuffing and mashed potatoes; and you all know my weakness for pie! I also got a question from a woman in my Nutrition for Weight Loss class about how to gracefully pass on the high-carb and gluten-ey items (she is gluten and dairy free, as am I).
Turkey

I double up on turkey and pass on the rolls.

So there are many pitfalls for us who are trying to eat real foods in balance, while watching the carbohydrates, to lose weight. Here are some things I do to handle the food choices gracefully:
  • Unless you have interfering aunts, or an overly-watchful mother, no one really notices what you're putting on your plate. Don't put anything on your plate to satisfy someone else (easier said than done, I know). For the interfering relatives, you can but out the old fashioned, “I'm watching my figure!” Works every time.
  • I typically double up on turkey, take a small amount of mashed potatoes, and load up on green veggies. I do have cranberries with my turkey. If I stick to this, I don't have the normal bloated, tired feeling after the meal.
  • Dessert is a mine field. I love pie, and there are usually five different kinds to choose from. I leave it to the day to decide if I will have a small piece. I gauge how I am feeling and whether or not I will feel too deprived if I pass on it. Usually, if I can get a nice cup of coffee with real whipping cream I am fine. Otherwise, I go for it. I just insist on a pie made with butter and not hydrogenated oils.

Have a favorite tip for eating during the holidays? Leave a comment.

 

 

 


A book review for your health: Wheat Belly

For many months now I have been obsessed with how unhealthy everyone looks. It logically started when warm weather hit and I was at the pool a lot. I couldn't help but notice all of the teenage girls in bikinis, thin everywhere but a protruding stomach. And all of the men with large, very hard bellies. Or, shopping at Target and seeing so many people looking pale, tired and, well, very large. Having been overweight most of my life, I used to feel very alone. If I were obese now, I would have lots of company.
Which brings me to reknowned cardiologist Dr. William Davis's book, Wheat Belly. My interest in his book was piqued when I first heard him on Dishing Up Nutrition. When I read the book's intro, I was struck by his memory of when women and men, in the Mad Men era, were effortlessly thin. The most exercise he ever saw his size 4 mother do was vacuum the stairs. Women and men with large bellies were rare. He also remarks that today, even marathon runners and triathletes carry extra weight–America, where even the thin people are fat–and despite all of their working out can't maintain a healthy weight.
Apollo 11 Astronauts eating breakfast before launch in 1969
What's the difference between then and now? The abundance of wheat and “healthy whole grains” in our diets that's what. Look at this photo of the APOLLO 11 astronauts the morning before launch. They are eating steak and eggs (cooked in butter no doubt). The toast was likely an afterthought because they would have been so full from a protein and fat-rich breakfast. Bread was used like a condiment. Today, it is often the main course. And my guess is that these guys didn't work out nearly as strenuously as today's weekend warrior triathlete. And yet they are lean and healthy.
Dr. Davis asks, “Your dad called his rudimentary mid-twentieth-century equivalent a beer belly. But what are soccer moms, kids, and half of your friends and neighbors who don't drink beer doing with a beer belly?” He calls it a wheat belly, and it results from years of consuming foods that trigger insulin, the hormone that stores fat. He goes on to talk about how the negative effects of consuming wheat show up in every organ of the body, including the brain and skin.
I hope you check out the podcast and the book. I know so many people who are suffering needlessly because of gluten (the protein in wheat) intolerance, manifesting in joint deterioration, brain fog, obesity, and more. Remember Dr. Davis is a cardiologist, and he has observed amazing changes in people's health and improvement in heart disease at his practice in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
I commend Dr. Davis for his book. Coming out against wheat and “healthy whole grains” (the food companies way of grasping at straws to make health claim) is sacrileage in this country. When I tell people that I don't eat wheat I get the “You're crazy” look or the “But, it's the staff of life!” comment. I have lost weight because of giving up wheat among other changes. I think when it comes to our health, we need to question what we are being told is healthy and stay open to changes that may scare us.

Low carb recipe site review

I have been speaking to groups of people about my story. They are taking the Nutrition 4 Weight Loss series at Nutritional Weight and Wellness (weightandwellness.com). I always try to give them some practical information about how to eat and keep the food interesting. Anyone who has tried to change their nutrition knows how difficult this can be in our food culture (the pan of brownies at your work snack table may look more interesting than that hard boiled egg and celery!). I know. I feel like I am talking to myself about this all day long, because the society I live in does not value healthful eating.

So on that note, I have a great recipe site to share with you. Theroadfromfattofit.blogspot.com offers many great low carb recipes, and better yet, she takes your old high carb favorites and offers low carb versions (pizza with a meat crust!). She also takes great photos of ingredients and each step of the process. I so appreciate the work involved in this illustration. I have tried many of the recipes, and they have been delicious. The blog offers a crock pot recipes as well.

Check it out. Tell me about a favorite recipe site you have used!

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Chicken and bacon crock pot stew