Betty Draper Goes to Weight Watchers

My husband and I are streaming and watching Season 5 of Mad Men (spoiler alert).Last night we watched the episodes in which Betty Draper (now Francis) begins to struggle with her weight, initially because of a growth on her thyroid gland and then because of her overwhelming cravings.

Betty Draper Francis Gains Weight

Betty Draper Gains Weight in Season 5 of Mad Men

It was eerie to see how well the writers and actress capture her food rituals and emotions as this “always thin and beautiful” woman shifts in her identity. Some examples:

  • When she fakes sick to get out going to a party because her dress won't zip.
  • Her daughter leaves a half-finished ice cream sunday on the table, and after a couple of beats, Betty finishes it.
  • After joining one of the first Weight Watchers groups, she accepts a bite of steak her husband offers her after midnight because she can “count it toward the next day's food.”
  • Starving, she runs to her fridge and squirts Redi whip into her mouth, savors it for a moment, and then spits it out, so the calories won't “stick.”
  • Nervously discussing the impending Thanksgiving Holiday with her WW group and how they will prepare emotionally. Smash cut to Betty with the most pathetic Thanksgiving plate in front of her–four small bites of each entree and a single brussels sprout lording in the center of the plate.
  • Betty catches a glimpse of her ex-husband's very thin wife putting on her shirt. The look on her face is a perfect mix of envy and sadness.

These episodes evoked a variety of emotions in me–sadness, dread, fear. Mostly, I recognized myself and my struggle with weight in every scene. In one episode, Betty is waiting in line to get weighed in front of everyone at her WW meeting, as the “weigher” proclaims “you had a good week!” to one of the women. I was right back in all of the WW meetings I had ever attended. I could almost feel the heat rising in my face as I remembered getting the “good week” message, and the devastation I felt when I got the silent treatment or “next week will be better!” message.

This story arc also showed me how my mother's generation became lifelong dieters, and then passed all that they knew down to my generation (and on and on). This generation forgot how their mothers ate to stay slim, and started blaming themselves for being weak willed and lacking in self-control. They also started trusting experts with products to sell, relying on diet pills, eating processed foods, and going on diets like Weight Watchers that reinforced the idea that their overeating was all emotions based.

We have spent a long time in the wilderness of low fat, low calorie eating. It's been a long time coming for advice like that from Julia Ross (her book: The Diet Cure) and Gary Taubes (his book: Why We Get Fat) to take hold, so women like Betty Draper don't have to suffer. They can finally understand the biochemical connections to their weight gain, and stop punishing themselves for their lack of will power.

 

 

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5 Comments on “Betty Draper Goes to Weight Watchers”

  1. Trimthin says:

    Great Post which inspire me to go for diet plan for burning Fat.
    Thanks a Lot.

  2. Kate says:

    Excellent, excellent post, Nell. Thank you for explaining more of my mother’s motives for putting me on a diet in 4th grade (or earlier) and sending me to the doctor for a diet pill prescription and making me feel inferior (“You’re a cow!”) when I really wasn’t fat, but she sure took me down that path. Am I bitter? You betcha!

  3. pat says:

    Hi Nell,

    This comment applies to one of your earlier posts on flavoring. The Splendid Table aired February 1, 2013, at 56 minutes into the hour long podcast, refers to ways to flavor sweet potato fries. I’m not a cook, and wasn’t able to catch all that she said — but it sounded good. If you listen in, and feel like posting, I’m guessing it might interest your readers. p


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